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Bicheno Blowhole
A trip to the coastal town of Bicheno isn’t complete without a visit to the dramatic Bicheno Blowhole. The blowhole springs out of the the signature pink granite rock along the east coast. Stop by during a large swell for the best action. Spotting the blowhole when out of action is a cinch thanks to the presence of a remarkable diamond shape boulder nearby.
Go Behind the Scene here. 
Photo credit: Published on Instagram by instatassie.   High-res

Bicheno Blowhole

A trip to the coastal town of Bicheno isn’t complete without a visit to the dramatic Bicheno Blowhole. The blowhole springs out of the the signature pink granite rock along the east coast. Stop by during a large swell for the best action. Spotting the blowhole when out of action is a cinch thanks to the presence of a remarkable diamond shape boulder nearby.

Go Behind the Scene here. 

Photo credit: Published on Instagram by instatassie.

Totem Pole
Located on the Tasman Peninsula is the Tasman National Park which is famous for its amazing coastline, including 300m high dolerite sea cliffs. This stunning and rugged coastline is perfect for an adventurer, especially the sea cliffs of the Candlestick and Totem Pole. If you love abseiling or rock climbing, the Tasman Peninsula is the place for you. 
Go Behind The Scenery here.
Reblogged from kamilsustiak   High-res

Totem Pole

Located on the Tasman Peninsula is the Tasman National Park which is famous for its amazing coastline, including 300m high dolerite sea cliffs. This stunning and rugged coastline is perfect for an adventurer, especially the sea cliffs of the Candlestick and Totem Pole. If you love abseiling or rock climbing, the Tasman Peninsula is the place for you. 

Go Behind The Scenery here.

Reblogged from kamilsustiak

Flinders Island
Flinders Island is the largest island of the Furneaux group and is incredibly remote. On the island you will find forests running down to the beaches, wetlands and lagoons. Flinders Island is great for long bush walks where you will see some of Tasmania’s greatest views.  
Go Behind The Scenery here.
Photo Credit: Published on Instagram by courtwalch   High-res

Flinders Island

Flinders Island is the largest island of the Furneaux group and is incredibly remote. On the island you will find forests running down to the beaches, wetlands and lagoons. Flinders Island is great for long bush walks where you will see some of Tasmania’s greatest views.  

Go Behind The Scenery here.

Photo Credit: Published on Instagram by courtwalch

Stanley & The Nut
The quiet fishing village of Stanley is overlooked by the dramatic headland The Nut that dominates the coastline. The Nut was formed by ancient volcanos, rising 143 metres from the sea.
Enjoy a stroll to the top for panoramic views or sit back and soak in the sights from the chairlift that takes visitors to the top. 
Go Behind The Scenery here.
Photo Credit: Published on Instagram by thisismylife_tasmania   High-res

Stanley & The Nut

The quiet fishing village of Stanley is overlooked by the dramatic headland The Nut that dominates the coastline. The Nut was formed by ancient volcanos, rising 143 metres from the sea.

Enjoy a stroll to the top for panoramic views or sit back and soak in the sights from the chairlift that takes visitors to the top. 

Go Behind The Scenery here.

Photo Credit: Published on Instagram by thisismylife_tasmania

Living History
Picturesque Sarah Island has a notorious past. The island was the site of Tasmania’s oldest convict settlement, managed from 1822 to 1833. The island is located in the heart of Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area, near Strahan. Take a harbour tour to the island to gain insight into the brutal and thrilling history of one of the severest penal settlements. 
Go Behind The Scenery here.
Photo Credit: Published on Instagram by vanessakind   High-res

Living History

Picturesque Sarah Island has a notorious past. The island was the site of Tasmania’s oldest convict settlement, managed from 1822 to 1833. The island is located in the heart of Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area, near Strahan. Take a harbour tour to the island to gain insight into the brutal and thrilling history of one of the severest penal settlements. 

Go Behind The Scenery here.

Photo Credit: Published on Instagram by vanessakind

The Elusive Platypus
Tasmania is a haven for many of Australia’s endemic species such as wallabies, wombats, pademelons, echindas and the Tasmania devil.
Perhaps the most elusive of the native animals is the unusual water-loving platypus. The platypus is a rare monotreme, one of only five species in the world. Monotremes are mammals which lay eggs instead of giving birth.
Bushwalkers should keep a keen eye out for this fascinating animal on the go in Tasmania. This little fella pictured was spotted in the island’s capital Hobart.
Go Behind The Scenery here.
Photo Credit: Published on Instagram by jollyfelt   High-res

The Elusive Platypus

Tasmania is a haven for many of Australia’s endemic species such as wallabies, wombats, pademelons, echindas and the Tasmania devil.

Perhaps the most elusive of the native animals is the unusual water-loving platypus. The platypus is a rare monotreme, one of only five species in the world. Monotremes are mammals which lay eggs instead of giving birth.

Bushwalkers should keep a keen eye out for this fascinating animal on the go in Tasmania. This little fella pictured was spotted in the island’s capital Hobart.

Go Behind The Scenery here.

Photo Credit: Published on Instagram by jollyfelt

Sunset Over The Derwent
Tasmania’s capital Hobart has a prime position on the mouth of the Derwent River underneath the spectacular Mount Wellington. The city is surrounded by beautiful sights every way you turn thanks to this location. It truly acts as a gateway to the state’s untouched wilderness, as nature is right on the city’s doorstop. 
Go Behind The Scenery here.
Photo Credit: Published on Instagram by lovethywalrus   High-res

Sunset Over The Derwent

Tasmania’s capital Hobart has a prime position on the mouth of the Derwent River underneath the spectacular Mount Wellington. The city is surrounded by beautiful sights every way you turn thanks to this location. It truly acts as a gateway to the state’s untouched wilderness, as nature is right on the city’s doorstop. 

Go Behind The Scenery here.

Photo Credit: Published on Instagram by lovethywalrus

Tranquil Sleepy Bay

Freycinet National Park is crisscrossed with beautiful bushwalks. One such short track leads to Sleepy Bay. The track lays about halfway to Cape Tourville and wanders along the picturesque coast. Take in the sights of the soft blue swells, orange-tinged granite rocks and thriving bushland that covers the surrounding hills. Pure bliss!

Go Behind The Scenery here.

Photo Credit: Jewels Lynch, found on Instagram here.

Chasing Waterfalls
Tasmania’s stunning and diverse natural landscape lends itself to countless wilderness experiences such as bushwalking, water rafting, surfing, fishing and more.
Escape into the lush green temperate rainforests or lively bushland to experience nature at its best and contemplate the remarkable surrounds.
Go Behind The Scenery here.
Reblogged from mistymorningme and sourced from brewer23

Chasing Waterfalls

Tasmania’s stunning and diverse natural landscape lends itself to countless wilderness experiences such as bushwalking, water rafting, surfing, fishing and more.

Escape into the lush green temperate rainforests or lively bushland to experience nature at its best and contemplate the remarkable surrounds.

Go Behind The Scenery here.

Reblogged from mistymorningme and sourced from brewer23

Calm Waters
Lake Pedder is considered to be the largest freshwater lake in Australia. Located in the South West wilderness of Tasmania, the lake was once natural but grew in size after damming in the area in 1972.
The beautiful, wild location is the perfect spot to put your feet up and indulge in a spot of fishing. The lake is known as a great area to catch trout.
Go Behind The Scenery here.
Photo Credit: Published on Instagram by camblakephotography   High-res

Calm Waters

Lake Pedder is considered to be the largest freshwater lake in Australia. Located in the South West wilderness of Tasmania, the lake was once natural but grew in size after damming in the area in 1972.

The beautiful, wild location is the perfect spot to put your feet up and indulge in a spot of fishing. The lake is known as a great area to catch trout.

Go Behind The Scenery here.

Photo Credit: Published on Instagram by camblakephotography

Starlit Walks
The walk up to Cradle Mountain summit has earned the reputation as one of the most beautiful in the world. Thanks to the area’s natural beauty, it’s not hard to see why. 
This picture of the dramatic Hanson Peak and unique heathlands resting under the crystal night sky pinpricked with thousands of tiny stars is just a snapshot of the remarkable sights found in the region.
Cradle Mountain - Lake St Clair National Park is home to a diverse natural environment including smooth glacial lakes, ancient rainforest, unusual alpine vegetation and many endemic animals. 
Go Behind The Scenery here.
Photo Credit: Published on Instagram by aaron154   High-res

Starlit Walks

The walk up to Cradle Mountain summit has earned the reputation as one of the most beautiful in the world. Thanks to the area’s natural beauty, it’s not hard to see why. 

This picture of the dramatic Hanson Peak and unique heathlands resting under the crystal night sky pinpricked with thousands of tiny stars is just a snapshot of the remarkable sights found in the region.

Cradle Mountain - Lake St Clair National Park is home to a diverse natural environment including smooth glacial lakes, ancient rainforest, unusual alpine vegetation and many endemic animals. 

Go Behind The Scenery here.

Photo Credit: Published on Instagram by aaron154

Fantastic Freycinet
Freycinet National Park is dotted with knuckles of granite mountains all but surrounded by azure bays and white sand beaches. The dramatic peaks of the Hazards welcome you as you enter the park.
Take a walk to the pass overlooking the perfectly shaped Wineglass Bay, trek the entire length of the Freycinet Peninsula on a three day walk or try a few more leisurely activities like beach strolls, swimming, kayaking or wildlife spotting.
Go Behind The Scenery here.
Photo Credit: Published on Instagram by elisaparkranger   High-res

Fantastic Freycinet

Freycinet National Park is dotted with knuckles of granite mountains all but surrounded by azure bays and white sand beaches. The dramatic peaks of the Hazards welcome you as you enter the park.

Take a walk to the pass overlooking the perfectly shaped Wineglass Bay, trek the entire length of the Freycinet Peninsula on a three day walk or try a few more leisurely activities like beach strolls, swimming, kayaking or wildlife spotting.

Go Behind The Scenery here.

Photo Credit: Published on Instagram by elisaparkranger

The Importance of Travelling Alone

In the third blog post about her recent Tasmanian journey, author Torre De Roche writes about meeting up with a fellow Tassie traveller and the joy experienced when discovering a new destination on your own. She writes: 

This is why it’s so important to learn how to love your own company, to travel solo, to dine for one. We are each living out our own journeys and so we much take care of our own needs, desires and dreams. We must learn to give generosity to ourselves so that we can suck the marrow from life, even if our companions can’t part ways with cappuccinos.”

Read the rest of Torre’s article here

Are you ready to behold the stunning beauty of Tasmania?

Go Behind The Scenery.

All images courtesy of Torre De Roche

Striking Cape Hauy
Part of the Tasman National Park on the Tasman Peninsula, the dramatic dolerite columns and cliffs at Cape Hauy are popular areas for climbing and abseiling. Known as ‘sea stacks’, the ‘Candlestick and ‘Totem Pole’ form the spectacular scenery of Cape Hauy and are well worth a visit. 
There are also great coastal walks on the Peninsula that take in other breathtaking landscapes, such as Cape Raoul and Cape Pillar.
Go Behind The Scenery here. 
Photo Credit: Published on Instagram by theviewfrom6ft   High-res

Striking Cape Hauy

Part of the Tasman National Park on the Tasman Peninsula, the dramatic dolerite columns and cliffs at Cape Hauy are popular areas for climbing and abseiling. Known as ‘sea stacks’, the ‘Candlestick and ‘Totem Pole’ form the spectacular scenery of Cape Hauy and are well worth a visit. 

There are also great coastal walks on the Peninsula that take in other breathtaking landscapes, such as Cape Raoul and Cape Pillar.

Go Behind The Scenery here. 

Photo Credit: Published on Instagram by theviewfrom6ft

Southern Snow
Tasmania has a cool temperate climate with four distinct seasons. It is also the lowest point of Australia, meaning it receives snowfall in high lying places as well as some of the coldest regions in the country.
The many beautiful and striking mountains peak through snow during the winter time. One such iconic sight is Mount Wellington looming snowcapped over the capital Hobart. It’s worth braving the chill to look down from one of these gorgeous rocky pinnacles to the natural landscape below.
Go Behind The Scenery here.
Reblogged from wildernesskids   High-res

Southern Snow

Tasmania has a cool temperate climate with four distinct seasons. It is also the lowest point of Australia, meaning it receives snowfall in high lying places as well as some of the coldest regions in the country.

The many beautiful and striking mountains peak through snow during the winter time. One such iconic sight is Mount Wellington looming snowcapped over the capital Hobart. It’s worth braving the chill to look down from one of these gorgeous rocky pinnacles to the natural landscape below.

Go Behind The Scenery here.

Reblogged from wildernesskids