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Into The Blue
Dip into the cool blue waters along the coastline of Freycinet National Park via sea kayak. It’s one of the best ways to explore the secluded coves, sandy white beaches and paddle over water so clear that you can see the marine life below.
Sea kayaking is minimal impact and pollution free, allowing visitors to soak in the surrounds without disturbing its pristine condition. The area is also blessed with a year round sunny climate, allowing the area’s spectacular natural beauty to shine through. 
Inexperienced kayakers are recommended to take a guided tour to navigate the waters and spot local wildlife such as the rare white bellied sea eagle and dolphins.
 For more information visit Freycinet Adventures website.
Go Behind The Scenery here.
Photo Credit: Published on Instagram by scottyscottyscotty   High-res

Into The Blue

Dip into the cool blue waters along the coastline of Freycinet National Park via sea kayak. It’s one of the best ways to explore the secluded coves, sandy white beaches and paddle over water so clear that you can see the marine life below.

Sea kayaking is minimal impact and pollution free, allowing visitors to soak in the surrounds without disturbing its pristine condition. The area is also blessed with a year round sunny climate, allowing the area’s spectacular natural beauty to shine through. 

Inexperienced kayakers are recommended to take a guided tour to navigate the waters and spot local wildlife such as the rare white bellied sea eagle and dolphins.

For more information visit Freycinet Adventures website.

Go Behind The Scenery here.

Photo Credit: Published on Instagram by scottyscottyscotty

Rainbow Fields
During October and November the fields across Table Cape erupt into a patchwork of spectacular colour. The source of this dramatic transformation is the blooming of the local flower fields that spread out across the volcanic plug, surrounding the local lighthouse, until a sharp 170-metre drop to the Bass Strait below.
Tulips are planted in March/April and then harvest begins in December. Visitors can wander through the rows of tulips, iris and liliums from the 27th September to 17th October this year as well as take part in the Bloomin’ Tulip Festival hosted by the nearby town Wynyard. 
Go Behind The Scenery here.
Photo Credit: Published on Instagram by montetuna.   High-res

Rainbow Fields

During October and November the fields across Table Cape erupt into a patchwork of spectacular colour. The source of this dramatic transformation is the blooming of the local flower fields that spread out across the volcanic plug, surrounding the local lighthouse, until a sharp 170-metre drop to the Bass Strait below.

Tulips are planted in March/April and then harvest begins in December. Visitors can wander through the rows of tulips, iris and liliums from the 27th September to 17th October this year as well as take part in the Bloomin’ Tulip Festival hosted by the nearby town Wynyard. 

Go Behind The Scenery here.

Photo Credit: Published on Instagram by montetuna.

Stanley & The Nut
Tasmania is home to an array of unique geological phenomenon, such as The Nut located on the edge of the quaint town of Stanley. The monumental volcanic plug dominates the landscape, rising 150 metres straight up from the ocean. 
The little coastal town is a fantastic launch pad for the region thanks to its beautifully preserved colonial buildings, charming cafes and B&B cottages. It’s the perfect hub for a visit to the nearby Tarkine wilderness, Rocky Cape National Park or Highfield Historic Site.
Closer to home, nothing beats the view atop The Nut. Climb the winding path to the plateau for an uninterrupted view from every angle or sit back in the open chairlift ride to the top pass seals backing in the sun and penguins coming in to nest in the evening.
Go Behind The Scenery here.
Photo Credit: Published on Instagram by swanesphotos   High-res

Stanley & The Nut

Tasmania is home to an array of unique geological phenomenon, such as The Nut located on the edge of the quaint town of Stanley. The monumental volcanic plug dominates the landscape, rising 150 metres straight up from the ocean. 

The little coastal town is a fantastic launch pad for the region thanks to its beautifully preserved colonial buildings, charming cafes and B&B cottages. It’s the perfect hub for a visit to the nearby Tarkine wilderness, Rocky Cape National Park or Highfield Historic Site.

Closer to home, nothing beats the view atop The Nut. Climb the winding path to the plateau for an uninterrupted view from every angle or sit back in the open chairlift ride to the top pass seals backing in the sun and penguins coming in to nest in the evening.

Go Behind The Scenery here.

Photo Credit: Published on Instagram by swanesphotos

Skyline Exploring

Bruny Island, aka a piece of Tassie paradise is only a ten minute flight from the centre of Hobart. Tasmanian Air Adventures offer a chance to soak in Tasmania’s famed and diverse landscapes from above. Their Bruny Island tour lifts off from Hobart, taking in the sweeping views of the city and Mount Wellington, before turning south across the Tasman Peninsula to the southernmost point of the island state. 

Towering dolerite sea cliffs rise sharply from the deep blue waters, broken up by gentle sandy beaches and vast expanses of untouched bushland. Look out for remarkable landmarks such as The Neck, the narrow isthmus that connects North and South Bruny Island (shown in bottom right picture) and a cluster of small islands known as The Friars, home to hundreds of Australian fur seals. Lucky adventurers are advised to keep an eye out for dolphins playing in the sheltered waters of D’Entrecasteaux Channel and the surrounds.

Tasmanian Air Adventures also offer an optional beach picnic on one of the many beautiful beaches in the area. Dine on Tasmanian wine, cheese and sweet treats in the midst of the island’s untouched surroundings.

Learn more about Tasmanian Air Adventures on their website.

Go Behind The Scenery here.

Photo Credits: Published on Instagram by lovethywalrus

Snow Business At Mount Field

Mount Field is Tasmania’s first national park, with a unique array of alpine plants and wildlife - from the eastern quoll to the platypus. As you follow the winding road that leads to the higher peaks of the mountain pass the diversity of the flora increases; a unique feature of the area.

The Pandani Grove walk will take you by the serene Lake Dobson and the pencil pine forest nearby. The area is brimming with waterfalls including Lady Barron Falls, Horseshoe Falls and the unbelievably picturesque Russell Falls, which can be seen up close via an easy walk. If you’re walking at night and switch off your torch, you can even spot glow worms amongst the vegetation surrounding the falls.

In winter things get pretty snowy. Mount Field is a well-loved skiing venue with tows operating on the slopes, (weather conditions permitting).

The park is a one hour drive from Hobart via New Norfolk.

Go Behind The Scenery here.

Photo Credit: Published on Instagram by stephlomay

Wildlife Paradise
Dubbed the ‘Serengeti of Tasmania’, Narawntapu National Park is located on Tasmania’s central north coast, a 90-minute drive from Launceston.
It’s a great spot to catch native wildlife in close quarters, especially at dusk, when you might see anything from the Forester kangaroos pictured to the smaller Bennett’s wallabies and wombats. If you’re lucky (and quiet!) you might even hear the screeches of the endangered Tasmanian devils.
Birdwatchers will also have a field day with the park’s plethora of feathered residents, which include rosellas, robins, honeyeaters and majestic black cockatoos. The endangered Tasmanian wedge-tailed eagle and white-bellied sea eagles can also be spotted closer to the water. Take a dip in idyllic swimming spots Bakes Beach and Badgers beach, drop a line at one of many prime fishing spots and keep one eye of the sky above to catch of glimpse of the unique birdlife.
There are a number of walks criss-crossing the area, shorter ones under two hours return and longer day walks. If you’re a game hiker opt for the trek up to the appropriately named Mount Vision, which offers spectacular glimpses of the coast along with rare plants and wildflowers. There are also a number of prehistoric refuse pits, known as shell middens, dotted along the coastline, which offer insight into the history and culture of the region’s traditional owners, the Northern Midlands Aborigines.
There’s a 26-kilometre horse riding trail for those who prefer to sit back and enjoy the scenery. Within the park there are horse yards as well as several camping areas where you can stay overnight. 
Whatever takes your fancy, you’ll find an adventure waiting for you at Narawntapu National Park!
Go Behind The Scenes here.
Photo Credit: Published on Instagram by Tasmania via MattGlastonbury   High-res

Wildlife Paradise

Dubbed the ‘Serengeti of Tasmania’, Narawntapu National Park is located on Tasmania’s central north coast, a 90-minute drive from Launceston.

It’s a great spot to catch native wildlife in close quarters, especially at dusk, when you might see anything from the Forester kangaroos pictured to the smaller Bennett’s wallabies and wombats. If you’re lucky (and quiet!) you might even hear the screeches of the endangered Tasmanian devils.

Birdwatchers will also have a field day with the park’s plethora of feathered residents, which include rosellas, robins, honeyeaters and majestic black cockatoos. The endangered Tasmanian wedge-tailed eagle and white-bellied sea eagles can also be spotted closer to the water. Take a dip in idyllic swimming spots Bakes Beach and Badgers beach, drop a line at one of many prime fishing spots and keep one eye of the sky above to catch of glimpse of the unique birdlife.

There are a number of walks criss-crossing the area, shorter ones under two hours return and longer day walks. If you’re a game hiker opt for the trek up to the appropriately named Mount Vision, which offers spectacular glimpses of the coast along with rare plants and wildflowers. There are also a number of prehistoric refuse pits, known as shell middens, dotted along the coastline, which offer insight into the history and culture of the region’s traditional owners, the Northern Midlands Aborigines.

There’s a 26-kilometre horse riding trail for those who prefer to sit back and enjoy the scenery. Within the park there are horse yards as well as several camping areas where you can stay overnight. 

Whatever takes your fancy, you’ll find an adventure waiting for you at Narawntapu National Park!

Go Behind The Scenes here.

Photo Credit: Published on Instagram by Tasmania via MattGlastonbury

Hop To It
Bonorong Wildlife Sanctuary has been providing Tasmania’s native animals a safe haven for many years now, and its visitors an intimate insight into their stories and conservation efforts. Many of the wild and fragile creatures that call Tasmania home have never existed anywhere else or have only survived on the isolated island. Bonorong takes pride in helping wildlife continue to thrive in the unique landscape.
Their conservation efforts include a 24-hour rescue service manned by volunteers who bring in thousands of distressed animals every year. Every animal that passes through its gates is lovingly nursed until ready to set back into the wild. Get up close and personal with a constantly changing guestlist of wombats, devils, quolls, native birds, possums, koalas, lizards, snakes and emus.
The sanctuary aims to better the Tasmanian environment, rather than act as a showcase. They also are passionate about their Tasmanian devil breeding program that’s helping boost the population of the endangered and rare species. 
Learn more about Bonorong Wildlife Sanctuary here. 
Go Behind The Scenery here.
Photo Credit: Published on Instagram by kathrynleahy   High-res

Hop To It

Bonorong Wildlife Sanctuary has been providing Tasmania’s native animals a safe haven for many years now, and its visitors an intimate insight into their stories and conservation efforts. Many of the wild and fragile creatures that call Tasmania home have never existed anywhere else or have only survived on the isolated island. Bonorong takes pride in helping wildlife continue to thrive in the unique landscape.

Their conservation efforts include a 24-hour rescue service manned by volunteers who bring in thousands of distressed animals every year. Every animal that passes through its gates is lovingly nursed until ready to set back into the wild. Get up close and personal with a constantly changing guestlist of wombats, devils, quolls, native birds, possums, koalas, lizards, snakes and emus.

The sanctuary aims to better the Tasmanian environment, rather than act as a showcase. They also are passionate about their Tasmanian devil breeding program that’s helping boost the population of the endangered and rare species. 

Learn more about Bonorong Wildlife Sanctuary here

Go Behind The Scenery here.

Photo Credit: Published on Instagram by kathrynleahy

Dolphins Ahoy In Coles Bay
With a population of just 200 people, this quiet peninsula is one of the world’s best-kept travel secrets. The Coles Bay area rests at the foot of The Hazards mountain range in the picturesque surrounds of the Freycinet National Park on Tasmania’s east coast. It’s a great area for water sports, and has some particularly good fishing spots.
The town experiences more than 300 days of sunshine a year, which means plenty of opportunities to explore the pristine beaches nearby; the stunning Wineglass Bay and Friendly Beaches are only a stone’s throw away. If you don’t feel like walking, you can take a Wineglass Bay Cruise from the Coles Bay jetty along the Freycinet Peninsula, with a side of sparkling wine and delicious local produce.
The bay is often visited by pods of dolphins. If you’re brave enough you can join them. Let them come to you, they’re friendly and love to say hello!
Coles Bay is a two and a half hour drive from both Hobart and Launceston.
Go Behind The Scenery here.
Photo Credit: Published on Instagram by insta_graham23   High-res

Dolphins Ahoy In Coles Bay

With a population of just 200 people, this quiet peninsula is one of the world’s best-kept travel secrets. The Coles Bay area rests at the foot of The Hazards mountain range in the picturesque surrounds of the Freycinet National Park on Tasmania’s east coast. It’s a great area for water sports, and has some particularly good fishing spots.

The town experiences more than 300 days of sunshine a year, which means plenty of opportunities to explore the pristine beaches nearby; the stunning Wineglass Bay and Friendly Beaches are only a stone’s throw away. If you don’t feel like walking, you can take a Wineglass Bay Cruise from the Coles Bay jetty along the Freycinet Peninsula, with a side of sparkling wine and delicious local produce.

The bay is often visited by pods of dolphins. If you’re brave enough you can join them. Let them come to you, they’re friendly and love to say hello!

Coles Bay is a two and a half hour drive from both Hobart and Launceston.

Go Behind The Scenery here.

Photo Credit: Published on Instagram by insta_graham23

Food Lover’s Nirvana
Tasmania is a foodie heaven, offering a smorgasbord of delicious rewards for the culinarily curious.
From Freycinet marine farm fresh shellfish to artisan cheese with a side of baked goods, Tassie fare is sustainable and unique. Guests of Saffire Freycinet can don waders and enjoy a gourmet seafood experience surrounded by the tranquil marine farm.  For a more classic fine dining experience, go straight to The Source at MONA, which offers the best of Tasmania’s fresh produce served up with a French twist.
If liquid nourishment is more your style, there’s ample tasty options to tempt you and their point of difference is the purity of Tassie’s water. It’s said an apple a day keeps the doctor away, so we can only imagine the benefits heritage orchard ciders would offer you! Whisky is another Tasmanian specialty - there’s trails aplenty just waiting to be discovered. 
Head over to Restaurant Australia for all the gourmet gratuities. 
Go Behind The Scenery here.
Photo Credit: Published on restaurantaustralia.com   High-res

Food Lover’s Nirvana

Tasmania is a foodie heaven, offering a smorgasbord of delicious rewards for the culinarily curious.

From Freycinet marine farm fresh shellfish to artisan cheese with a side of baked goods, Tassie fare is sustainable and unique. Guests of Saffire Freycinet can don waders and enjoy a gourmet seafood experience surrounded by the tranquil marine farm.  For a more classic fine dining experience, go straight to The Source at MONA, which offers the best of Tasmania’s fresh produce served up with a French twist.

If liquid nourishment is more your style, there’s ample tasty options to tempt you and their point of difference is the purity of Tassie’s water. It’s said an apple a day keeps the doctor away, so we can only imagine the benefits heritage orchard ciders would offer you! Whisky is another Tasmanian specialty - there’s trails aplenty just waiting to be discovered. 

Head over to Restaurant Australia for all the gourmet gratuities. 

Go Behind The Scenery here.

Photo Credit: Published on restaurantaustralia.com

Four Must-Do’s in Port Arthur

Port Arthur lives on as a reminder of Tasmanian’s colonial past. The infamous UNESCO World Heritage Site’s haunted history seems to be etched across the crumbling sandstone remains. Whilst visiting the site, make sure to tick these must-do’s off your Tassie bucket list:

1. Picnic At Scorpion Rock: Take a moment to soak in the magnitude of the site and its incredible history from the lookout. The view looks out across the ruined church into the bay beyond (as seen in the middle image).

2. The Penitentiary And Surrounds: The imposing Penitentiary building constructed in 1843, housed over 480 convicts. Port Arthur became the preferred site to send the British convicts who were repeat offenders between 1833 and 1853. Many men and women were convicted of trivial crimes by today’s standards such as petty theft. 

3. Coal Mines Historic Site: Tasmanian’s first operational mine formed part of a brutal system of rigorous convict forced labour. The harsh daily life of the over 600 convicts working during the busiest years is fascinating and harrowing to hear.

4. Ghost Tour: After dark the brutal history of the area, creeps from the shadows of the ruins. The eerie atmosphere has led many to believe that the victims of the site’s convict history continue to haunt the site to this day. Take a guided tour through the ruins to learn more about the area’s dark past.

Learn more by visiting the Port Arthur Historic Site Management Authority’s website here.

Go Behind The Scenery here.

Photo Credit: Published on Instagram by jayedevil.

Valley Of The Giants
The sheer magnitude of Tasmania’s sweeping temperate forests will stop you in your tracks. Styx Valley, less than two hours from Hobart, boasts some of the highest hardwood trees in the world. The Big Tree Reserve protects these gentle giants that scrape the sky.
Some of the species that dominate the landscape, such as the Swamp Gum, have graced the land for over 400 years and can grow up to 95-metres; that’s taller than a 25-storey building! Visitors can stroll through the ancient temperate forest along an easy-going boardwalk known as the Tolkien Track. 
Go Behind The Scenery here.
Reblogged from kathrynleahy   High-res

Valley Of The Giants

The sheer magnitude of Tasmania’s sweeping temperate forests will stop you in your tracks. Styx Valley, less than two hours from Hobart, boasts some of the highest hardwood trees in the world. The Big Tree Reserve protects these gentle giants that scrape the sky.

Some of the species that dominate the landscape, such as the Swamp Gum, have graced the land for over 400 years and can grow up to 95-metres; that’s taller than a 25-storey building! Visitors can stroll through the ancient temperate forest along an easy-going boardwalk known as the Tolkien Track. 

Go Behind The Scenery here.

Reblogged from kathrynleahy

Snow Tipped Cradle Mountain
During the winter months, the peaks of craggy Cradle Mountain are softened and transformed by soft swirls of snow. Take in the view from the shores of Dove Lake; breathing in the cool crisp air, the unusual scents of flora found no where else in the world whilst listening to the gentle rustle of the alpine landscape.
A circuit trip around the edge of the glacial lake reveals unique flora and fauna that flourishes in this wintry terrain, such as the cool Ballroom Forest where myrtle-beech trees reach majestically high above leaving a trail of moss from branch to forest floor.
After an idle day soaking in the atmosphere, escape into the warmth of an open fireplace at the luxurious Peppers Cradle Mountain Lodge for an overnight stay.
Go Behind The Scenery here.
Photo Credit: Francois Fourie, see more of his incredible photography on his website.     High-res

Snow Tipped Cradle Mountain

During the winter months, the peaks of craggy Cradle Mountain are softened and transformed by soft swirls of snow. Take in the view from the shores of Dove Lake; breathing in the cool crisp air, the unusual scents of flora found no where else in the world whilst listening to the gentle rustle of the alpine landscape.

A circuit trip around the edge of the glacial lake reveals unique flora and fauna that flourishes in this wintry terrain, such as the cool Ballroom Forest where myrtle-beech trees reach majestically high above leaving a trail of moss from branch to forest floor.

After an idle day soaking in the atmosphere, escape into the warmth of an open fireplace at the luxurious Peppers Cradle Mountain Lodge for an overnight stay.

Go Behind The Scenery here.

Photo Credit: Francois Fourie, see more of his incredible photography on his website.  

Coasting King Island
Smack bang in the middle of the ferocious Roaring Forties - the strong winds that rip through Bass Strait - lies the picturesque King Island. This quiet corner of the world is home to only 1,600 locals spread across just over 1,000 square kilometres.
This tiny island offers a spectacular range of the freshest produce for passionate foodies. Sample the island’s infamous beef and cheeses, dip fresh-from-the-oven bread into locally made honey or feast on fresh salty lobster, crab and crayfish. A great time to visit is in February when the Long Table Festival runs; celebrating the region’s very best produce. 
Go Behind The Scenery here.
Photo Credit: Published on Instagram by insta_graham23   High-res

Coasting King Island

Smack bang in the middle of the ferocious Roaring Forties - the strong winds that rip through Bass Strait - lies the picturesque King Island. This quiet corner of the world is home to only 1,600 locals spread across just over 1,000 square kilometres.

This tiny island offers a spectacular range of the freshest produce for passionate foodies. Sample the island’s infamous beef and cheeses, dip fresh-from-the-oven bread into locally made honey or feast on fresh salty lobster, crab and crayfish. A great time to visit is in February when the Long Table Festival runs; celebrating the region’s very best produce. 

Go Behind The Scenery here.

Photo Credit: Published on Instagram by insta_graham23

View From The Top

This incredible timelapse sequence video shows the night time movements of Tasmania’s capital Hobart. The video was shot from the formidable Mount Wellington; 1276 metres above the harbour city.

Adventure seekers can reach the top via Pinnacle Road, detouring along the way via one of the many incredible scenic walking tracks such as O’Grady’s Falls and Sphinx Rock. The lookout at the summit, known as the Pinnacle Observation Shelter, is also a quick drive away from the heart of Hobart.

Go Behind The Scenery here.

Video Credit: Published on Vimeo by Grant Willis.

Hazards Beach Circuit
Tasmania is riddled with hundreds of spectacular walks through diverse unspoiled natural environments. Beach lovers will relish the opportunity to explore the pristine stretch of the Freycinet National Park on the east coast. The challenging Hazards Beach Circuit is a spectacular way to soak in the scenery if short on time. It’s worthwhile setting aside at least a full day to see the beautiful coastal vistas. The five hour return circuit via Wineglass Bay heads uphill to the Wineglass Bay lookout, skirting the coastline and meandering through native bushland along the way.
Wineglass Bay is considered one of the most beautiful beaches in the world. When looking out across the arc of fine quartz sand and dappled waters, it’s not hard to see why. Lucky visitors may catch a glimpse of bottlenose dolphins playing in the waters. Take your time on the walk to indulge in a picnic of Tasmania’s famed local produce, paddle through the crystal water and count how many of the unique native flora and fauna you can spot. You’ll probably lose count very quickly as the area is brimming with life!
Go Behind The Scenery here.
Photo credit: Published on Instagram by elisaparkranger.   High-res

Hazards Beach Circuit

Tasmania is riddled with hundreds of spectacular walks through diverse unspoiled natural environments. Beach lovers will relish the opportunity to explore the pristine stretch of the Freycinet National Park on the east coast. The challenging Hazards Beach Circuit is a spectacular way to soak in the scenery if short on time. It’s worthwhile setting aside at least a full day to see the beautiful coastal vistas. The five hour return circuit via Wineglass Bay heads uphill to the Wineglass Bay lookout, skirting the coastline and meandering through native bushland along the way.

Wineglass Bay is considered one of the most beautiful beaches in the world. When looking out across the arc of fine quartz sand and dappled waters, it’s not hard to see why. Lucky visitors may catch a glimpse of bottlenose dolphins playing in the waters. Take your time on the walk to indulge in a picnic of Tasmania’s famed local produce, paddle through the crystal water and count how many of the unique native flora and fauna you can spot. You’ll probably lose count very quickly as the area is brimming with life!

Go Behind The Scenery here.

Photo credit: Published on Instagram by elisaparkranger.